CNS In-Depth

People, machines and dogs hunt for drugs in the mail

NEW YORK – “It was all sealed like a bottle of lotion.” The U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer explained that he had just cut open a package apparently shipped from Hong Kong. Inside was what looked like a glass…

Russian occupiers silence Crimean journalist in court

Dangerous Reporting: A series of profiles about foreign journalists imprisoned, in hiding, or silenced by courts for reporting on the most sensitive subjects in their countries By MAEVE DUNIGAN Capital News Service COLLEGE PARK, Maryland – In the early morning…

Maryland Democratic lawmakers press oversight of Trump administration

Since Donald Trump’s first week as president, Maryland Democratic lawmakers have been at the forefront of a widespread effort to hold the administration accountable for potentially illegal or unethical behavior, possible conflicts of interest, questionable travel practices, and contacts with Russians during and since last year’s presidential election.

Inside Maryland’s opioid crisis

Abuse of heroin, prescription painkillers and other opioids has claimed thousands of lives in Maryland over the last decade.

Samantha’s journey: Rehabilitation center houses mothers and their children

CROWNSVILLE, Maryland—Samantha Griebel is recovering from opioid addiction, after using heroin throughout her pregnancy. Thanks to Chrysalis House, a rehabilitation center that allows mothers to live with their children, Griebel regained custody of her daughter and could raise her child while living a life of sobriety.

Pedestrian casualties mount in Maryland town as officials defer action

At least 138 pedestrians have been struck by vehicles in the past eight years on a lethal two-mile stretch of state highway that runs through this low-income immigrant community in the Washington suburbs. Eight have died.

Uneven nursing home oversight allows patients to slip through cracks

In December, a 59-year-old woman who cannot speak after throat cancer surgery was left outside of a Baltimore homeless center with no money and no phone — in a city where she had no family and no close friends. She had fallen into a black hole in the regulatory system designed to protect nursing home patients.

To Make Room for Purple Line, Homes in Working Class Neighborhoods Must Go

As Purple Line development moves forward, residents and business owners feel the impact of its construction on their homes and pockets.

Why Baltimore Can’t Keep Its Poorest Residents Healthy

Why is Baltimore’s world-renowned health system struggling to keep the city’s poorest residents from getting sick?