Virginia

Harpers Ferry rock climbers worry closures could set precedent for future access

HARPERS FERRY, West Virginia – “This is not how the Park Service is supposed to work.” That’s according to Eric Murdock, policy director for the Access Fund, a rock climbing advocacy organization that has worked with land managers all over…

Equal Rights Amendment may be near ratification, but must overcome old deadline

WASHINGTON – The Equal Rights Amendment may be close to ratification following Democratic wins in Virginia’s House and Senate and proposed House and Senate resolutions to remove the ratification deadline. The ERA would guarantee equal constitutional rights to a person…

High court to weigh Trump’s ending of program for young, undocumented immigrants

WASHINGTON – The Supreme Court is due to hear arguments next week over the constitutionality of President Donald Trump’s decision to terminate a program that protects young, undocumented immigrants from deportation.  Both Democratic and Republican lawmakers, 165 educational institutions (including…

Six things riders might like to know from Metro’s update to Congress

WASHINGTON – The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority’s recent update to Congress contained a half-dozen takeaways for commuters and visitors who ride the Metro rail system in the national capital region. Metro, which first began operations in 1976 and now…

Supreme Court to weigh Virginia life sentences in Washington sniper case

WASHINGTON – The Supreme Court will hear oral arguments Wednesday over whether to uphold Virginia’s life sentences without parole imposed on Washington sniper Lee Boyd Malvo for murders and other crimes committed when he was 17. Malvo and his partner,…

Railroad’s rusting Potomac River span facing overhaul – and maybe more

WASHINGTON – Of the eight bridges connecting the nation’s capital to northern Virginia across the Potomac River, only one is a railroad bridge. And that one stands out for its, shall we say, reddish tint. But plans are moving forward…

Virginia Expresses ‘Profound Regret’ for History of Lynchings

Outlining a “dark and shameful chapter of American history,” state legislators have unanimously passed resolutions to “acknowledge with profound regret the existence and acceptance of lynching” in Virginia, where more than 80 people — mostly African-American men — were killed by mobs in the decades after the Civil War.